Editorials

The Pursuit of the Paperless Office

 It is estimated that less than 20% of all records that have traditionally been paper-based have been converted to electronic formats. For example, according to AdvancedMD.com, only 10% - 15% of medical records are handled electronically. This statistic is especially interesting since the term “paperless office” was coined over 30 years ago with the development of the personal computer. In today’s terms, we call the “paperless office” document imaging.

There are many things that are preventing us from making the shift to a paperless office. Some of the reasons you may find in your organisation can be as simple as your employees’ resistance to change or not having faith that technology will keep your documents safe and secure. Whatever your reason for resisting the move to a paperless environment may be, the bottom line is that it requires change to see the paperless office as a reality. Document imaging requires a fundamental shift in the way we do business.

Standardization Around the Office

Continuing our discussion on standardization in a previous article, when any organization increases the number of network devices its IT department is required to manage, management costs can increase. Some of the technology that an IT professional is already required to understand in most organizations include: desktop operating systems, network operating systems, authentication servers, email servers, web servers, telephone systems, document management systems, enterprise resource management systems, databases, copiers and printers. Some organizations will have even more.

Standardization can help to reduce the number of systems that an IT professional is required to learn and maintain. This can help to allow for greater efficiencies in maintaining information systems but can also provide for a greater level of security because your IT professionals and office staff will have a greater understanding of the systems you have in place.

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Cloud Computing on the Rise

There has been a lot of talk over the last few years about cloud computing. A system that integrates all of a company’s documents and files into an easy-to-use file sharing system that is remotely based rather than in a physical server, cloud computing is the next wave of technology to hit the data management industry.

The electronic storage of information on the Internet isn’t anything new. Companies that offer to store information in large online databases have been around for a few years now, boasting the safety of online storage vs. storing things physically. Their main selling point has always been the “peace of mind” approach (similar to insurance) in letting their customers know that their important information is protected against force majeure or other catastrophes.

Major Printing Trends Coming your Way

Companies are always looking for ways to cut costs and breed efficiency in the office. Sometimes an internal audit of systems and how things are managed can offer valuable information and insight on how things can be improved. It is becoming an important trend to alleviate expense in unnecessary areas, especially in an age of digital solutions and services.

One area that companies may be taking a look at first is how they are handling their inter-office printing strategies. Firms realise that there is a ton of money to be saved by just cutting down on the amount of printing that is done in the office. The major trends seem to point to more of an electronic data filing and storing method that eliminates the need of superfluous printing.

Selling More Print Equipment in a Down Market

When the markets are up and businesses are free with budgets, selling virtually any product is very easy. When revenues and profits are up, it is easy for budgets to be free.

The challenge that every business has during a down market is to prove their worth in a way that allows clients to see the value in what they have to offer. Selling in a down market can be a real challenge when the most common objection heard by a sales rep is, “I am sorry, but we just can’t spend any money right now because of the economy.”

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Cloud Computing on the Rise

There has been a lot of talk over the last few years about cloud computing. A system that integrates all of a company’s documents and files into an easy-to-use file sharing system that is remotely based rather than in a physical server, cloud computing is the next wave of technology to hit the data management industry.

The electronic storage of information on the Internet isn’t anything new. Companies that offer to store information in large online databases have been around for a few years now, boasting the safety of online storage vs. storing things physically. Their main selling point has always been the “peace of mind” approach (similar to insurance) in letting their customers know that their important information is protected against force majeure or other catastrophes.

The Pursuit of the Paperless Office

It is estimated that less than 20% of all records that have traditionally been paper-based have been converted to electronic formats. For example, according to AdvancedMD.com, only 10% - 15% of medical records are handled electronically. This statistic is especially interesting since the term “paperless office” was coined over 30 years ago with the development of the personal computer. In today’s terms, we call the “paperless office” document imaging.

There are many things that are preventing us from making the shift to a paperless office. Some of the reasons you may find in your organisation can be as simple as your employees’ resistance to change or not having faith that technology will keep your documents safe and secure. Whatever your reason for resisting the move to a paperless environment may be, the bottom line is that it requires change to see the paperless office as a reality. Document imaging requires a fundamental shift in the way we do business.

The Argument For Scanners and Scanning pt. 2

This article is an extension of the previous post. Here we discuss how scanners and scanning are essential in the quest for the paperless office. The quest continues!

When you take into consideration how long interoffice mail takes or how long it might take to get an approval on a document in your organization, it may not be a surprise to consider that electronic transfer for those documents really can save time in your business process. Scanning your paper documents can take your business process and not only allow for the document to be utilized by your employees on their computer more quickly, but it can allow for multiple employees to perform separate tasks at the same time on the same document. You may be able to copy a paper-based document, but then you wouldn’t all be working on the same original.

Standardisation Around the Office

Continuing our discussion on standardisation in a previous article, when any organisation increases the number of network devices its IT department is required to manage, management costs can increase. Some of the technology that an IT professional is already required to understand in most organisations include: Desktop operating systems, network operating systems, authentication servers, email servers, web servers, telephone systems, document management systems, enterprise resource management systems, databases, copiers and printers. Some organisations will have even more.

Standardisation can help to reduce the number of systems that an IT professional is required to learn and maintain. This can help to allow for greater efficiencies in maintaining information systems but can also provide for a greater level of security because your IT professionals and office staff will have a greater understanding of the systems you have in place.

Sharp Steps into Color Light Production, Establishes Cloud Presence at 2012 National Dealer Meeting

 By Jessica Schiffenhaus, Research Editor, August 1, 2012

Celebrating its 100th year in business and 40th year in the document business, Sharp held its 2012 national dealer meeting on July 15-18 at the Gaylord Texan Hotel in Dallas, Texas. This year’s highlights included the announcement of two new high-volume color models, three light-production monochrome units and the big player: Sharp’s first device in the color production space.

The company also announced its first cloud platform: The Sharp B2B Cloud Portal, from which dealers can access and purchase cloud solutions from Sharp and Partner Program members and manage them via a unified license management console. Along with the portal, Sharp introduced two Software as a Service (SaaS) offerings of its own: Collaboration and Document Management Service and Sharp Remote Device Manager as a service.

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